Flagstaff Mountain Film Summer Showcase- Indigenous Voices

The Flagstaff Mountain Film Festival and The Orpheum Theater Presents

Flagstaff Mountain Film Summer Showcase- Indigenous Voices

Lakota in America, Water Warriors, Then Now and Forever: Zuni in the Grand Canyon, A Glimpse of the Dine, Too Precious to Mine

Thursday, July 19 2018

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 6:30 pm

10.00

This event is all ages

Flagstaff Mountain Film Summer Showcase- Indigenous Voices
Flagstaff Mountain Film Summer Showcase- Indigenous Voices
A selection of films from our 2018 festival that highlights indigenous voices and cultures.
Lakota in America
Lakota in America
15mins -

For nearly a hundred years, it was illegal to practice Lakota customs. Now, the Cheyenne River Youth Project is working with young people like Genevieve to create a stronger economic and cultural future—and they’re using their Lakota heritage to get there.
Water Warriors
Water Warriors
21mins -

Water Warriors is the story of a community’s successful resistance against the oil and gas industry. When an energy company begins searching for natural gas in New Brunswick, Canada, indigenous and white families unite to drive out the company in a campaign to protect their water and way of life.
Then Now and Forever: Zuni in the Grand Canyon
Then Now and Forever: Zuni in the Grand Canyon
27mins -

Throughout their history, the A:shiwi people have made a pilgrimage through the Grand Canyon to leave offerings at traditional sites, gather materials for their cultural practices, and visit the place where their ancestors first emerged from the four Underworlds and into the light of day.
A Glimpse of the Dine
A Glimpse of the Dine
10mins -

This film documents a little glimpse of the Dinè People (AKA Navajo) and their culture at the Western Navajo Fair in Tuba City, Arizona.
Too Precious to Mine
Too Precious to Mine
10mins -

The Grand Canyon is an irreplaceable natural treasure. Its stunning vistas, ancient geology, and winding Colorado River are world renowned — drawing over 5.5 million visitors to the park each year. Yet, irresponsibly operated uranium mines located on federal public land just miles from the North and South Rims threaten to permanently pollute the Grand Canyon landscape and the greater Colorado River.